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January 04 2016

IPv6 celebrates its 20th birthday by reaching 10 percent deployment | Ars Technica

Twenty years ago this month, RFC 1883 was published: Internet Protocol, Version 6 (IPv6) Specification. First the good news. According to Google's statistics, on December 26, the world reached 9.98 percent IPv6 deployment, up from just under 6 percent a year earlier. [...] During weekends, a tenth of Google's users are able to do this, but during weekdays it's less than 8 percent. Apparently more people have IPv6 available at home than at work.

Google also keeps a map of the world with IPv6 deployment numbers per country, handily color-coded for our convenience. More and more countries are turning green, with the US at nearly 25 percent IPv6, and Belgium still leading the world at almost 43 percent. Many other countries in Europe and Latin America and even Canada have turned green in the past year or two, but a lot of others are still stubbornly staying white, with IPv6 deployment figures well below one percent. Some, including China and many African nations, are even turning red or orange, indicating that IPv6 users in those countries experience significantly worse performance than IPv4 users.

[link to article]

Reposted fromscience science viamondkroete mondkroete

October 29 2015

5413 b834 500
Reposted fromfadenb fadenb

December 13 2012

Ich habe mal einen etwas älteren Post aktualisiert und die Webseiten der DAX-30 Unternehmen auf IP getestet (IPv4 setze ich mal voraus)...

> for i in adidas.de allianz.de deutschland.basf.com bayer.de beiersdorf.de bmw.de commerzbank.de conti-online.com daimler.com deutsche-bank.de deutsche-boerse.com lufthansa.com dhl.de telekom.de eon.de fresenius.de fmc-ag.de heidelbergcement.com henkel.de infineon.com k-plus-s.com linde.com lanxess.de merck.de munichre.com rwe.com rwe.de sap.com siemens.de thyssenkrupp.com volkswagen.de volkswagenag.com ; do echo -n "$i: " ; dig aaaa +short $i ; echo "" ; echo -n "www.$i: " ; dig aaaa +short www.$i ; echo "" ; done

www.adidas.de: adidas.de.



www.bayer.de: orig-10003.bayer.cotcdn.net.

www.beiersdorf.de: beiersdorf-cx-cdn-global.gss.consultix.net.

www.bmw.de: www-digital.bmw.de.edgekey.net.



www.daimler.com: www.cms.daimler.com.

www.deutsche-bank.de: deutschebank.tec.db.com.

www.deutsche-boerse.com: deutsche-boerse.com.

www.lufthansa.com: orig-10001.lufthansa.cotcdb.net.




www.fresenius.de: wlb1.fresenius.de.

www.fmc-ag.de: wlb1.fresenius.de.


www.henkel.de: henkel.de.

www.infineon.com: cs18.wpc.edgecastcdn.net.

www.k-plus-s.com: web-prod.k-plus-s.com.

www.linde.com: corporate2.linde.com.


www.merck.de: td.merck.de.




www.sap.com: www.gtm.sap.com.



www.volkswagen.de: www.volkswagen.com.c.footprint.net.

www.volkswagenag.com: www.volkswagen.com.c.footprint.net.

Einige DNS-Einträge verweisen auf weitere:
> for i in orig-10003.bayer.cotcdn.net. beiersdorf-cx-cdn-global.gss.consultix.net. e5013.b.akamaiedge.net. www.cms.daimler.com. deutschebank.tec.db.com. deutsche-boerse.com. orig-10001.lufthansa.cotcdb.net. wlb1.fresenius.de. cs18.wpc.edgecastcdn.net. web-prod.k-plus-s.com. corporate2.linde.com. td.merck.de. www.gtm.sap.com. www.volkswagen.com.c.footprint.net. ; do echo -n "$i: " ; dig aaaa +short $i ; echo "" ; done


Fazit: bei keinem einzigen Unternehmen lässt sich die Webseite via IP(v6) ansprechen.
Hochtechnologie in Deutschland.
Reposted fromfinkregh finkregh
1772 d0c5
how do you know ipv6 is getting more interesting? loads of reposts on http://ipv6-group.soup.io/

June 24 2012

$ host soup.io                       soup.io has address soup.io has IPv6 address 2a02:1b8:10:17::bada:55
Just in case you hadn't noticed already ;)
Reposted fromlutoma lutoma

March 18 2012

<@\vanilla\> ipv6 + ftp? <@\vanilla\> what is this, steampunk?
— So true.
Reposted fromantifuchs antifuchs viayetzt yetzt

August 03 2011


JEDES technische Gerät erhält damit eine lebenslange feste, einmalige, unverwechselbare IPv6-Nummer, die von jedem weltweit registriert und gespeichert werden kann.


6) eine IPv6 darf nicht geheim installiert werden.


Profil | Sozialdemokratische Partei Deutschlands (SPD)
Reposted fromfinkregh finkregh

June 09 2011

I've seen a few already today!

www.facebook.com has IPv6 address 2620:0:1c18:0:face:b00c::
cisco.v6day.akadns.net has IPv6 address 2001:420:80:1:c:15c0:d06:f00d
www.luns.net.uk has IPv6 address 2a01:8900:0:1::b00b:1e5
www.bbc.net.uk has IPv6 address 2001:4b10:bbc::1

Does v6 kick off 'IP addresses as a marketing tool'? :)

World IPv6 Day: Most-watched Tech Event Since Y2K - Slashdot
Reposted fromm68k m68k viamondkroete mondkroete

June 08 2011

IPv6-Erhebung am Hochtechnologiestandort Deutschland.

Es wurden die Homepages der DAX-Unternehmen auf IPv6-Support untersucht.

Hostname                             IPv6-Adresse
--------                             ------------
www.adidas.com                     : -
www.allianz.de                     : -
www.basf.com                       : -
www.bayer.de                       : -
www.beiersdorf.de                  : -
www.bmw.de                         : -
www.commerzbank.de                 : -
www.daimler.com                    : -
www.db.com                         : -
deutsche-boerse.com                : -
www.telekom.de                     : -
www.eon.de                         : -
www.fmc-ag.de                      : -
www.fresenius.de                   : -
www.heidelbergcement.com           : -
www.henkel.de                      : -
www.infineon.com                   : -
www.k-plus-s.com                   : -
www.the-linde-group.com            : -
www.lufthansa.com                  : -
www.man.de                         : -
www.merck.de                       : -
www.metro24.de                     : -
www.munichre.com                   : -
www.rwe.de                         : -
www.sap.com                        : -
www.siemens.com                    : -
www.thyssenkrupp.com               : -
www.volkswagenag.com               : -
www.google.de                      : 2a00:1450:4008:c00:0:0:0:6a
www.facebook.com                   : 2620:0:1c08:4000:face:b00c:0:1
www.sixxs.net                      : 2001:838:2:1:2a0:24ff:feab:3b53
www.he.net                         : 2001:470:0:76:0:0:0:2
www.microsoft.com                  : 2a01:111:200a:1:0:0:0:13
www.apple.com                      : -
Reposted fromfinkregh finkregh

May 16 2011

Reposted bytonnerredocsteeltichgahermznsk1pflederrattienoodlesharmoniawchaosieareyouborednicoduckpythablstrikermodulzerobtwotchleonnkrannixfpletzqchnleonnlasoupecremesouperheckpietn0gjv6psygateelseleyreralphabetididntorderthatbuttscratcherkisasanapocnazcoshallowdatenwolfdanielbohrerlordminxsofiasdrfredmondkroetenordernoleandernaichneoraiderhax404AndiincastrolutomawaaaaarghDellfringerzEveRciaconlydschiDiviuschybanie

April 15 2011

We wish to inform you that as of Friday, 15 April 2011, the APNIC pool reached the Final /8 IPv4 address block, bringing us to Stage Three of IPv4 exhaustion in the Asia Pacific.

Last /8 address policy

IPv4 requests will now be assessed under section 9.10 in "Policies for IPv4 address space management in the Asia Pacific region".

APNIC's objective during Stage Three is to provide IPv4 address space for new entrants to the market and for those deploying IPv6.

From now, all new and existing APNIC account holders will be entitled to receive a maximum allocation of a /22 from the Final /8 address space.

Act NOW on IPv6

We encourage Asia Pacific Internet community members to deploy IPv6 within their organizations. You can refer to APNIC for information regarding IPv6 deployment, statistics, training, and related regional policies.

Apply for IPv6 addresses now!

APNIC - APNIC IPv4 Address Pool Reaches Final /8

April 06 2011

April 01 2011

The global migration to IPv6 has been slow coming. Even as the last few remaining chunks of IPv4 address space are being allocated, many organizations around the world are just now beginning to look at IPv6. And what they're finding often isn't pretty: mediocre application support, security issues, and really long addresses that are hard to rattle off. It has been estimated that a significant move toward IPv6 won't be seen for at least five years, and IPv6 won't be on par with its predecessor for at least another ten.

This got some people within the IETF thinking about an alternative to the new protocol. Realizing that the primary goal of IPv6 was to provide an increased address space, they began to reconsider whether an entirely new protocol was really necessary in the first place. Still in its infancy, work is underway on a new IETF draft which ditches IPv6 altogether in favor of a simple extension to its predecessor: IPv4.1.

The initiative is being spearheaded by Joe Kisanyu, who explains his team's motivation quite simply:

We've been going back and forth about how to implement IPv6 for years now, and frankly we just haven't been getting anywhere. So my team and I sat down and said, let's start from scratch and see if we can't do better this time around. After a few days, there was this epiphany: We can just add an octet to a regular IPv4 address!

This revelation quickly led to the development of IPv4.1, which is nearly identical in operation to IPv4 but features a slightly longer 40-bit address. The header specification below, adapted from RFC 791, should look familiar.

    0                   1                   2                   3                   4
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
   |Version|  IHL  |Type of Service|          Total Length         |
   |         Identification        |Flags|      Fragment Offset    |
   |  Time to Live |    Protocol   |         Header Checksum       |
   |                                Source Address                                   |
   |                             Destination Address                                 |
   |                    Options                    |    Padding    |

The solution here is pretty clever: an IPv4.1 has five octets instead of four, e.g. Similarly, subnet masks can now range from zero for forty bits in length, e.g. for a point-to-point link. And backward-compatibility is built in! Legacy IPv4 addresses will are expressed with the first octet set to zero, e.g. DNS records for IPv4.1 addresses are to be designated as "B records" (successive to IPv4 A records).

The draft specification is still in a very rough form, but I was able to obtain an alpha copy of the IPv4.1 protocol stack implemented on Linux. Using the new address scheme comes quite naturally.

$ nslookup ipv41.testing.ietf.org

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:   ipv41.testing.ietf.org
$ ping
PING ( 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from icmp_seq=1 ttl=248 time=89.6 ms
64 bytes from icmp_seq=2 ttl=248 time=90.0 ms
64 bytes from icmp_seq=3 ttl=248 time=91.6 ms
--- ping statistics ---
3 packets transmitted, 3 received, 0% packet loss, time 2002ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 89.672/90.479/91.668/0.925 ms
Alternative to IPv6 in the Works - Packet Life
Reposted byuhomeDerOrwischerFreXxXRekrut-Kdanielbohrerabl

March 31 2011

RFC 6177 has obsoleted its predecessor, updating or negating the three core recommendations as such:

1) It is no longer recommended that /128s be given out. While there may be some cases where assigning only a single address may be justified, a site, by definition, implies multiple subnets and multiple devices.

2) RFC 3177 specifically recommended using prefix lengths of /48, /64, and /128. Specifying a small number of fixed boundaries has raised concerns that implementations and operational practices might become "hard-coded" to recognize only those fixed boundaries (i.e., a return to "classful addressing"). The actual intention has always been that there be no hard-coded boundaries within addresses, and that Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) continues to apply to all bits of the routing prefixes.

3) This document moves away from the previous recommendation that a single default assignment size (e.g., a /48) makes sense for all end sites in the general case. End sites come in different shapes and sizes, and a one-size-fits-all approach is not necessary or appropriate.

In summary, the IETF has decided that deciding on prefix sizes for end sites is "an issue for the operational community." However, section five of the RFC does offer some guidance well wroth reading for those writing internal IPv6 address allocation policies.

IETF Lifts /48 Recommendation for End Sites - Packet Life

February 12 2011

<@\vanilla\> ipv6 + ftp? <@\vanilla\> what is this, steampunk?
— So true.
Reposted fromantifuchs antifuchs

February 06 2011

5419 b83c 500
Duke Nukem 3D - Kick Ass and Assign IPv4 Addresses
Reposted fromyogan yogan viaodessa2 odessa2

February 05 2011

'Cogent (AS 174): please IPv6 peer with us! xoxox, Hurricane Electric (AS 6939)'
via Peering Disputes Migrate to IPv6 « Data Center Knowledge
Reposted fromastera astera
Dozent schlägt Gedenkminute für IPv4 vor.
Reposted fromcheatha cheatha viamondkroete mondkroete
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